Maarten Balliauw {blog}

ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, Windows Azure, PHP, ...

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Pro NuGet second edition is out

Pro NuGet will learn you all there is to know about NuGetPfew! Around February 2013, Xavier and I started planning work on an update of our book. Eight months later, we’re proud to present you with Pro NuGet (second edition). It’s been a tough couple of months writing this: Xavier has become a father for the second time (congratulations!), we’ve had two massive updates to NuGet we had to work in our book, … But here it is!

What’s new?

  • A number of workflows with NuGet have changed and have been added. Expect all of these, including NuGet’s old and new package restore functionality.
  • Want to work with NuGet and Windows Azure Websites, TeamCity, Visual Studio Online, OctopusDeploy, NuGet Gallery, ProGet or MyGet? We have a bunch of recipes for you!
  • Pitfalls of package versioning
  • Building a plugin system based on NuGet

Next to that there is a lot more meat in there!

  • Understand how NuGet fits into the big picture of your software development process to save you time and money.
  • How to keep your team working when your project depends on an external resource (such as a web service or cloud) which suddenly becomes unavailable.
  • Whether or not to auto-update NuGet packages within a continuous integration process for maximum reliability and speed.
  • How to combine NuGet with PowerShell to create your own Cmdlets and extend the base toolset in an extremely powerful manner.
  • Evaluate the pros-and-cons of hosting your own NuGet repository.
  • How to incorporate NuGet seamlessly within your continuous integration process.
  • Much much more!

We would love to get your feedback! E-mail us or write a review on your blog or Amazon. Enjoy the read!

PS: Thanks to our excellent reviewers (the NuGet team) and everyone at Apress! There is a lot of people involved in getting a quality book out there. Thanks!

Community Day 2011 - Fun with ASP.NET MVC, MEF and NuGet

To start the blog post: AWESOME! That’s what I have to say about the latest edition of Community Day 2011. I had the privilege of doing a session on ASP.NET MVC 3, MEF and NuGet, and as promised to the audience: here are the slides. For those who want to see the session, the recording can be found on Channel 9 from a previous event.

“Fun with ASP.NET MVC3, MEF and NuGet”
Community Day 2011, Mechelen, Belgium, 23/06/2011

Abstract: “So you have a team of developers… And a nice architecture to build on… How about making that architecture easy for everyone and getting developers up to speed quickly? Learn all about integrating the managed extensibility framework (MEF) and ASP.NET MVC with some NuGet sauce for creating loosely coupled, easy to use architectures that anyone can grasp.

Here’s the slides:

Here’s the example code: Fun with ASP.NET MVC 3 MEF - CommunityDay 2011.zip (6.79 mb)

Some resources:

MyGet now supports pushing from the command line

One of the work items we had opened for MyGet was the ability to push packages to a private feed from the command line. Only a few hours after our initial launch, David Fowler provided us with example code on how to implement NuGet command line pushes on the server side. An evening of coding later, I quickly hacked this into MyGet, which means that we now support pushing packages from the command line!

For those that did not catch up with my blog post overload of the past week: MyGet offers you the possibility to create your own, private, filtered NuGet feed for use in the Visual Studio Package Manager.  It can contain packages from the official NuGet feed as well as your private packages, hosted on MyGet. Want a sample? Add this feed to your Visual Studio package manager: http://www.myget.org/F/chucknorris

Pushing a package from the command line to MyGet

The first thing you’ll be needing is an API key for your private feed. This can be obtained through the “Edit Feed” link, where you’ll see an API key listed as well as a button to regenerate the API key, just in case someone steals it from you while giving a demo of MyGet :-)

image

Once you have the API key, it can be stored into the NuGet executable’s settings by running the following command, including your private API key and your private feed URL:

1 NuGet setApiKey c18673a2-7b57-4207-8b29-7bb57c04f070 -Source http://www.myget.org/F/testfeed

After that, you can easily push a package to your private feed. The package will automatically show up on the website and your private feed. Do note that this can take a few minutes to propagate.

1 NuGet push RouteMagic.0.2.2.2.nupkg -Source http://www.myget.org/F/testfeed

More on the command line can be found on the NuGet documentation wiki.

Other change: authentication to the website

Someone on Twitter (@corydeppen) complained he had to login using Windows Live ID. Because we’re using the Windows Azure AppFabric Access Control Service (which I’ll abbreviate to ACS next time), this was in fact a no-brainer. We now support Windows Live ID, Google, Yahoo! and Facebook as authentication mechanisms for MyGet. Enjoy!

Creating your own private NuGet feed: MyGet

myget - NuGet as a serverEver since NuGet came out, I’ve been thinking about leveraging it in a corporate environment. I've seen two NuGet server implementations appear on the Internet: the official NuGet gallery server and Phil Haack’s NuGet.Server package. As these both are good, there’s one thing wrong with them: you can't be lazy! You have to do some stuff you don’t always want to do, namely: configure and deploy.

After discussing some ideas with my colleague Xavier Decoster, we decided it’s time to turn our heads into the cloud: we’re providing you NuGet-as-a-Service (NaaS)! Say hello to MyGet.

MyGet offers you the possibility to create your own, private, filtered NuGet feed for use in the Visual Studio Package Manager.
It can contain packages from the official NuGet feed as well as your private packages, hosted on MyGet. Want a sample? Add this feed to your Visual Studio package manager: http://www.myget.org/F/chucknorris

But wait, there’s more: we’re open sourcing this thing! Feel free to fork over at CodePlex and extend our "product". We've already covered some feature requests we would love to see, and Xavier has posted some more on his blog. In short: feel free to add your own most-wanted features, provide us with bugfixes (pretty sure there will be a lot since we hacked this together in a very short time). We're hosting on WIndows Azure, which means you should get the Windows Azure SDK installed prior to contributing. Unless you feel that you can write code without locally debugging :-)

Chuck Norris Feed

Feel free to go ahead and create your private feed. Some ideas (more at Xavier's site):

  • A feed containing only the packages you or your company often use
  • A feed containing only your (open-source?) project and its dependencies
  • A feed containing just a few packages that you want to use for a certain project: tell your developers to just install them all

Bugs and feature requests? Feel free to post them as a comment below. Once we release the sources, I’ll kick your mailbox with a request to implement the stuff you proposed. Seems fair to me :-)

Enjoy http://myget.org!

Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Platform Update 1 KB2478063 Service Pack 5 Feature Set 3.1 R2 November Edition RTW

As you can see, a new .NET Framework version just came out. Read about it at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/endpoint/archive/2011/04/18/microsoft-net-framework-4-platform-update-1.aspx. Now why does my title not match with the title from the blog post I referenced? Well… How is this going to help people?

For those who don’t see the problem, let me explain… If we get new people on board that are not yet proficient enough in .NET, they all struggle with some concepts. Concepts like: service packs for a development framework. Or better: client profile stuff! Stuff that breaks their code because stuff is missing in there! I feel like this is going the Java road where every version has a billion updates associated with it. That’s not where we want to go, right? The Java side?

image

As I’m saying: why not make things clear and call these “updates” something like .NET 4.1 or so? Simple major/minor versions. We’re developers, not marketeers. We’re developers, not ITPro who enjoy these strange names to bill yet another upgrade to their customers

How am I going to persuade my manager to move to the next version? Telling him that we now should use “Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Platform Update 1 KB2478063” instead of telling “hey, there’s a new .NET 4! It’s .NET 4.1 and it’s shiny and new!”.

It seems I’m not alone with this thought. Hadi Hariri also blogged about it. And I expect more to follow... If you feel the same: now is the time to stop this madness! I suspect there’s an R2 November Edition coming otherwise…

[Edit @ 14:00] Here's how to use it in NuGet. Seems this thing is actually ".NET 4.0.1" under the hood.
[Edit @ 14:01] And here's another one. And another one.
[Edit] And Scott Hanselman chimes in: www.hanselman.com/.../...oftProductVersioning.aspx

Slides for my talk at MIX11: Fun with ASP.NET MVC 3, MEF and NuGet

As promised, here are the slides and demo code for my talk "Fun with ASP.NET MVC 3, MEF and NuGet" I presented at MIX in Las Vegas.

Abstract: "So you have a team of developers… And a nice architecture to build on… How about making that architecture easy for everyone and getting developers up to speed quickly? Learn all about integrating the managed extensibility framework (MEF) and ASP.NET MVC with some NuGet sauce for creating loosely coupled, easy to use architectures that anyone can grasp."

The recorded session: (on Channel 9)

 

The slide deck:

The demo code: 2011-04-14 Fun with ASP.NET MVC 3 MEF.zip (6.76 mb)

Enjoy! And thanks for joining!

kick it on DotNetKicks.com

Official Belgium TechDays 2011 Windows Phone 7 app released

I’m proud to announce that we (RealDolmen) have released the official Belgium TechDays 2011 Windows Phone 7 app! The official Belgium TechDays 2011 gives you the ability to browse current & upcoming sessions, as well as provide LIVE feedback to the event organizers. Is the current session awesome? Let us know! Is the food too spicy? Let us know!

Why am I blogging this? Well: one of the first sessions at the event will be Silverlight, Windows Phone 7, Windows Azure, jQuery, OData and RIA Services. Shaken, not stirred, deliverd by Kevin Dockx and myself. It will feature this WIndows Phone 7 application as well as the backoffice for it (Silverlight), the mobile web front-end (jQuery mobile), the web front-end (MVC), the integration points with the event organizers and the deployment on Windows Azure. Not to mention the twitterwall that integrates with this. ANd the top sessions ranking that will be displayed based on input from all the channels I mentioned before. In short: I’m blogging this to plug our session :-)

Interested in what we’ve built? Or just a consumer of WP7 apps? Download the app at http://techdays.realdolmen.com or directly by clicking the picture below:

Download the official Techdays 2011 application for WIndows Phone 7

See you at TechDays!

Thank you for getting me in Vegas!

I wish to thank everyone who has been voring for getting me in Vegas, speaking at MIX11. Without having expectations, I was really really surprised (and happy!) my session got selected. Thanks a bunch!

MIX11_BB_I'mSpeakingAt_2

Oh and thanks, RealDolmen, for supporting me in doing things like this!

ASP.NET MVC and the Managed Extensibility Framewok on NuGet

imageIf you search on my blog, there’s a bunch of posts where I talk about ASP.NET MVC and MEF. And what’s cool: these posts are the ones that are actually being read quite often. I’m not sure about which bloggers actually update their posts like if it was software, but I don’t. Old posts are outdated, that’s the convention when coming to my blog. However I recently received a on of questions if I could do something with ASP.NET MVC 3 and MEF. I did, and I took things seriously.

I’m not sure if you know MefContrib. MefContrib is a community-developed library of extensions to the Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF). I decided to wear my bad-ass shoes and finally got around installing a Windows-friendly Git client and decided to just contribute an ASP.NET MVC + MEF component to MefContrib. And while I was at it, I created some NuGet packages for all MefContrib components.

Let’s see how easy it is to use ASP.NET MVC and MEF…

Here’s the sample code I used: MefMvc.zip (698.58 kb)

Obtaining MefContrib.MVC3 in an ASP.NET MVC application

Here’s the short version of this blog post section for the insiders: Install-Package MefContrib.MVC3

Assuming you have already heard something about NuGet, let’s get straight to business. Right-click your ASP.NET MVC project in Visual Studio and select “Add Library Package Reference…”. Search for “MefContrib.MVC3”. Once found, click the “Install” button.

This action will download and reference the new MefContrib.Web.Mvc assembly I contributed as well as the MefContrib package.

How to get started?

You may notice a new file “AppStart_MefContribMVC3.cs” being added to your project. This one is executed at application start and wires all the MEF-specific components into ASP.NET MVC 3. Need something else than our defaults? Go ahead and customize this file. Are you happy with this code block? Continue reading…

You may know that MEF is cool as ICE and thus works with Import, Compose and Export. This means that you can now start composing your application using [Import] and [Export] attributes, MefContrib will do the rest. In earlier posts I did, this also meant that you should decorate your controllers with an [Export] attribute. Having used this approach on many projects, most developers simply forget to do this at the controller model. Therefore, MefContrib.Web.Mvc  uses the ConventionCatalog from MefContrib to automatically export every controller it can find. Easy!

To prove it works, open your FormsAuthenticationService class and add an ExportAttribute to it. Like so:

1 [Export(typeof(IFormsAuthenticationService))] 2 public class FormsAuthenticationService : IFormsAuthenticationService 3 { 4 // ... 5 }

Do the same for the AccountMembershipService class:

1 [Export(typeof(IMembershipService))] 2 public class AccountMembershipService : IMembershipService 3 { 4 // ... 5 }

Now open up the AccountController and lose the Initialize method. Yes, just delete it! We’ll tell MEF to resolve the IFormsAuthenticationService and IMembershipService. You can even choose how you do it. Option one is to add properties for both and add an ImportAttribute there:

1 public class AccountController : Controller 2 { 3 [Import] 4 public IFormsAuthenticationService FormsService { get; set; } 5 6 [Import] 7 public IMembershipService MembershipService { get; set; } 8 9 // ... 10 }

The other option is to use an ImportingConstructor:

1 public class AccountController : Controller 2 { 3 public IFormsAuthenticationService FormsService { get; set; } 4 public IMembershipService MembershipService { get; set; } 5 6 [ImportingConstructor] 7 public AccountController(IFormsAuthenticationService formsService, IMembershipService membershipService) 8 { 9 FormsService = formsService; 10 MembershipService = membershipService; 11 } 12 }

Now run your application, visit the AccountController and behold: dependencies have been automatically resolved.

Conclusion

There’s two conclusions to make: MEF and ASP.NET MVC3 are now easier than ever and available through NuGet. Second: MefContrib is now also available on NuGet, featuring nifty additions like the ConventionCatalog and AOP-style interception.

Enjoy! Here’s the sample code I used: MefMvc.zip (698.58 kb)

Need domain registration?

Viva, Las Vegas!

Vote your MIX sessionI have asked it last year, and I’ll ask it again. One of my session proposals made it to the “short”list for MIX11. One thing left though: votes are the only currency to get my session proposal in Vegas.

Here’s the session abstract:

Fun with ASP.NET MVC 3 and MEF

So you have a team of developers? And a nice architecture to build on? How about making that architecture easy for everyone and getting developers up to speed quickly? Learn all about integrating the managed extensibility framework and ASP.NET MVC for creating loosely coupled, easy to use architectures that anyone can grasp.

If you think this session deserves a place in Vegas, please cast your vote right here. And while you are at it, feel free to vote for both of my direct colleagues Kevin Dockx and Sandrino Di Mattia as well.

PS: No, I will not steal Mike Tyson’s tiger.