Maarten Balliauw {blog}

Web development, NuGet, Microsoft Azure, PHP, ...


Ready for a Windows Azure roadtrip?


A while ago, Michelangelo van Dam (a hardcore PHP guy), François Hertay (a hardcore Java guru) and myself (a .NET guy) were asked if we wanted to write about some of our experiences with the Windows Azure platform.

Starting next week, you’ll find about 3 blog posts per week and/or videos on Windows Azure (both a getting started level as well as some fun advanced posts) on a freshly released website:

I have the honour of kicking off a series of blog posts on .NET, starting with a level 100 one: the what & why of Windows Azure for .NET developers.

Let’s knock at an open door: Windows Azure is a cloud platform. It’s a group of services offered by Microsoft that enable you to build your applications using the typical characteristics of a cloud platform: everything is self-service, on-demand and pay-per-use. You are the one demanding resources like virtual machines or storage and you pay for what you use, depending on how much you use for how long. No contract periods – well, there is one: you always pay for at least one hour if you use these resources.

Read more on! And keep an eye on that site as I have some fun posts coming there :-)

Social meet up on Twitter for MEET Windows Azure on June 7th

AzureBanner_300x250Here’s a perhaps rather redundant event for you but it should be kind of fun: MEET Windows Azure on Twitter (+ Beer). The idea is to list people who have a twitter account and intend to follow the MEET Windows Azure event via live streaming on June 7th (1pm PDT).

So see you online for the event on the 7th! My Twitter handle is @maartenballiauw

MEET Windows Azure Blog Relay:

+ Beer? Since you are watching the event from your coucnh (or the totilet, or your bed, or actually, from wherever you want), feel free to open up a beer.

Call to action: Link to this blog post on your blog and I will update this post to link to you!

The world is changing: the future of IT

imageI’ve had my say on cloud and the new world of IT already in an earlier post, Predictions for the future. Today, I’m seeing signs the world is in fact starting to change. Sites like Instagram started small and grew big in no time. Were the founders IT wonders? No. And you don’t have to be.

Not so long ago, it would have taken you a lot of time and resources to get your idea up and running on the Internet. Especially if it required multiple datacenters and scalability. You would have to deploy a bunch of servers and make sure you had an agile IT environment in place in order to get things running and keep things flexible, a key requirement for many startups but also for large organizations.

Today, cloud platforms like Windows Azure change the rules. Anyone can now build an advanced application architecture backed by an advanced infrastructure. Platform-as-a-service offerings like Windows Azure offer you the possibility to distribute users between different geographical regions. They offer you storage in multiple datacenters. They enable you to continuously deploy new versions of your software and easily rollback should things go wrong.

The cloud is not new technology. Virtualization is used. System administrators still run the datacenter. It’s about new ideas and possibilities. The datacenter we knew before, is just the fabric in which your ideas come to life. A thin software layer on top of the giant hardware pool that is available makes sure that anyone can quickly combine a large number of easy-to-use building blocks to empower your idea. It makes advanced, global-scale projects easy and cheap and yet, more reliable.

Everyone on the globe, a small startup or a large organization, can now take advantage of the same IT possibilities that were previously only available for businesses running their own datacenter. Today, I can set up a global application that scales in a few hours at a very low-risk and price.

Of course, you need some supporting services for your business as well. For the development part, source control and issue tracking may be useful. GitHub, TFS Online and many others offer that as-a-Service, up and running in no time. For local teams, for distributed teams. The same story with e-mail, customer relation management, or even billing your customers. You can easily set up a new company or a new team based on the capabilities the new world of IT has to offer.

All of this has an impact on several areas. As small, agile startups or teams start working on their ideas and have a low time-to-market due to all of this, they can benefit over slow, unadapted large organizations. They can make higher profits because of the commodity services available in the cloud. They can make higher profits because organizations not making use of these technologies will fall behind. Probably sooner than we all think at this point in time. Large organizations will have to adapt to small, lean teams that know both the datacenter fabric they are working on as well as software. Silos will have to be broken down into lean teams, ready to make use of all that’s offered at the platform level. Ready to be fast-to-market or even first-to-market. Much like startups are small teams that often already make use of these new techniques.

Make your idea come to life in this changing new world.

Using the Windows Azure Content Delivery Network

As you know, Windows Azure is a very rich platform. Next to compute and storage, it offers a series of building blocks that simplify your life as a cloud developer. One of these building blocks is the content delivery network (CDN), which can be used for offloading content to a globally distributed network of servers, ensuring faster throughput to your end users.

I’ve been asked to write an article on this matter, which I did, and which is live at since today. As a small teaser, here’s the first section of it:

Reasons for using a CDN
There are a number of reasons to use a CDN. One of the obvious reasons lies in the nature of the CDN itself: a CDN is globally distributed and caches static content on edge nodes, closer to the end user. If a user accesses your web application and some of the files are cached on the CDN, the end user will download those files directly from the CDN, experiencing less latency in their request.

Another reason for using the CDN is throughput. If you look at a typical webpage, about 20% of it is HTML which was dynamically rendered based on the user’s request. The other 80% goes to static files like images, CSS, JavaScript, and so forth. Your server has to read those static files from disk and write them on the response stream, both actions which take away some of the resources available on your virtual machine. By moving static content to the CDN, your virtual machine will have more capacity available for generating dynamic content.

Here’s the full article: Using the Windows Azure Content Delivery Network

Protecting Windows Azure Web and Worker roles from malware

Most IT administrators will install some sort of virus scanner on your precious servers. Since the cloud, from a technical perspective, is just a server, why not follow that security best practice on Windows Azure too? It has gone by almost unnoticed, but last week Microsoft released the Microsoft Endpoint Protection for Windows Azure Customer Technology Preview. For the sake of bandwidth, I’ll be referring to it as EP.

EP offers real-time protection, scheduled scanning, malware remediation (a fancy word for quarantining), active protection and automatic signature updates. Sounds a lot like Microsoft Endpoint Protection or Windows Security Essentials? That’s no coincidence: EP is a Windows Azurified version of it.

Enabling anti-malware on Windows Azure

After installing the Microsoft Endpoint Protection for Windows Azure Customer Technology Preview, sorry, EP, a new Windows Azure import will be available. As with remote desktop or diagnostics, EP can be enabled by a simple XML one liner:

1 <Import moduleName="Antimalware" />

Here’s a sample web role ServiceDefinition.csdef file containing this new import:

1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> 2 <ServiceDefinition name="ChuckProject" 3 xmlns=""> 4 <WebRole name="ChuckNorris" vmsize="Small"> 5 <Sites> 6 <Site name="Web"> 7 <Bindings> 8 <Binding name="Endpoint1" endpointName="Endpoint1" /> 9 </Bindings> 10 </Site> 11 </Sites> 12 <Endpoints> 13 <InputEndpoint name="Endpoint1" protocol="http" port="80" /> 14 </Endpoints> 15 <Imports> 16 <Import moduleName="Antimalware" /> 17 <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" /> 18 </Imports> 19 </WebRole> 20 </ServiceDefinition>

That’s it! When you now deploy your Windows Azure solution, Microsoft Endpoint Protection will be installed, enabled and configured on your Windows Azure virtual machines.

Now since I started this blog post with “IT administrators”, chances are you want to fine-tune this plugin a little. No problem! The ServiceConfiguration.cscfg file has some options waiting to be eh, touched. And since these are in the service configuration, you can also modify them through the management portal, the management API, or sysadmin-style using PowerShell. Anyway, the following options are available:

  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.ServiceLocation – Specify the datacenter region where your application is deployed, for example “West Europe” or “East Asia”. This will speed up deployment time.
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.EnableAntimalware – Should EP be enabled or not?
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.EnableRealtimeProtection – Should real-time protection be enabled?
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.EnableWeeklyScheduledScans – Weekly scheduled scans enabled?
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.DayForWeeklyScheduledScans – Which day of the week (0 – 7 where 0 means daily)
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.TimeForWeeklyScheduledScans – What time should the scheduled scan run?
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.ExcludedExtensions – Specify file extensions to exclude from scanning (pip-delimited)
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.ExcludedPaths – Specify paths to exclude from scanning (pip-delimited)
  • Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Antimalware.ExcludedProcesses – Specify processes to exclude from scanning (pip-delimited)

Monitoring anti-malware on Windows Azure

How will you know if a threat has been detected? Well, luckily for us, Windows Endpoint Protection writes its logs to the System event log. Which means that you can simply add a specific data source in your diagnostics monitor and you’re done:

1 var configuration = DiagnosticMonitor.GetDefaultInitialConfiguration(); 2 3 // Note: if you need informational / verbose, also subscribe to levels 4 and 5 4 configuration.WindowsEventLog.DataSources.Add( 5 "System!*[System[Provider[@Name='Microsoft Antimalware'] and (Level=1 or Level=2 or Level=3)]]"); 6 7 configuration.WindowsEventLog.ScheduledTransferPeriod 8 = System.TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1); 9 10 DiagnosticMonitor.Start( 11 "Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Diagnostics.ConnectionString", 12 configuration);

In addition, EP also logs its inner workings to its installation folders. You can also include these in your diagnostics configuration:

1 var configuration = DiagnosticMonitor.GetDefaultInitialConfiguration(); 2 3 // ...add the event logs like in the previous code sample... 4 5 var mep1 = new DirectoryConfiguration(); 6 mep1.Container = "wad-endpointprotection-container"; 7 mep1.DirectoryQuotaInMB = 5; 8 mep1.Path = "%programdata%\Microsoft Endpoint Protection"; 9 10 var mep2 = new DirectoryConfiguration(); 11 mep2.Container = "wad-endpointprotection-container"; 12 mep2.DirectoryQuotaInMB = 5; 13 mep2.Path = "%programdata%\Microsoft\Microsoft Security Client"; 14 15 configuration.Directories.ScheduledTransferPeriod = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1.0); 16 configuration.Directories.DataSources.Add(mep1); 17 configuration.Directories.DataSources.Add(mep2); 18 19 DiagnosticMonitor.Start( 20 "Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Diagnostics.ConnectionString", 21 configuration);

From this moment one, you can use a tool like Cerebrata’s Diagnostics Monitor to check the event logs of all your Windows Azure instances that have anti-malware enabled.

TechDays Finland - Architectural Patterns for the Cloud - NuGet

As promised, here are the slide decks for the two sessions delivered at TechDays Finland last week.

Architectural Patterns for the Cloud

The promise of all cloud vendors out there is they can run your applications without changes. While that claim is true, it’s better to optimize existing software or design specifically for the cloud when moving or building an application. Architectural optimization will speed up your application, make it more scalable and even will make it cheaper to run on Windows Azure. This session will take you along some common patterns that are easy to implement and will make your cloud more sunny.

Organize your Chickens - NuGet for the Enterprise

Managing software dependencies, whether those created in-house or from third parties can be a pain in the behind. Whether dependencies feel like wild chickens or people run around like chickens dealing with dependencies, the NuGet package manager can be a cure. Let us guide you to creating enterprise (chicken) NuGets and dealing with them in a structured, easy-to-maintain manner. From developer workstation to build server, NuGet tastes great! We'll provide you the dip sauce.

Enjoy! And if there’s any feedback or questions, I would love to hear it.

Slides for TechDays Belgium 2012: SignalR

It was the last session on the last day of TechDays 2012 so I was expecting almost nobody to show up. Still, a packed room came to have a look at how to make the web realtime using SignalR. Thanks for joining and for being very cooperative during the demos!

As promised, here are the slides. You can also find the demo code here: SignalR. Code, not toothpaste - TechDays Belgium (2.74 mb)

A recording on Channel9 is available as well.

PS: The book on NuGet (Pro NuGet) which I mentioned can be (pre)ordered on Amazon.

How do you synchronize a million to-do lists?

Not this question, but a similar one, has been asked by one of our customers. An interesting question, isn’t it? Wait. It gets more interesting. I’ll sketch a fake scenario that’s similar to our customer’s question. Imagine you are building mobile applications to manage a simple to-do list. This software is available on Android, iPhone, iPad, Windows Phone 7 and via a web browser. One day, the decision to share to-do lists has been made. Me and my wife should be able to share one to-do list between us, having an up-to-date version of the list on every device we grant access to this to-do list. Now imagine there are a million of those groups, where every partner in the sync relationship has the latest version of the list on his device. In often a disconnected world.

How would you solve this?

My take: Windows Azure Service Bus Topics & Subscriptions

According to the Windows Azure Service Bus product description, it “implements a publish/subscribe pattern that delivers a highly scalable, flexible, and cost-effective way to publish messages from an application and deliver them to multiple subscribers.“ Interesting. I’m not going into the specifics of it (maybe in a next post), but the Windows Azure Service Bus gave me an idea: why not put all actions (add an item, complete a to-do) on a queue, tagged with the appropriate “group” metadata? Here’s the producer side:

Windows Azure Service Bus Topics

On the consumer side, our devices are listening as well. Every device creates its subscription on the service bus topic. These subscriptions are named per device and filtered on the SyncGroup metadata. The Windows Azure Service Bus will take care of duplicating messages to every subscription as well as keeping track of messages that have not been processed: if I’m offline, messages are queued. If I’m online, I receive messages targeted at my device:

Windows Azure Service Bus Subscritpions

The only limitation to this is keeping the number of topics & subscriptions below the limits of Windows Azure Service Bus. But even then: if I just make sure every sync group is on the same bus, I can scale out over multiple service buses.

How would you solve the problem sketched? Comments are very welcomed!

Publishing symbol packages for a MyGet feed

MyGet host your NuGet feed serverEver since NuGet 1.2, there is a great way for NuGet package authors to let their users debug into the package’s binaries. With almost no additional effort, package authors can publish their symbols and sources, and package consumers can debug into them from Visual Studio, simply by pushing a symbols package in addition to the standard NuGet package.

SymbolSourceToday, we’re proud to announce MyGet has partnered with to offer an easy workflow to publish symbol packages for a private MyGet feed. This means from now on you can publish symbol packages for your private feeds as well!

On a sidenote: we're sharing API keys between both services. If you also want to share the same password with both services, simply go to your MyGet profile page and re-enter your password. We'll keep it in sync after that.

Publishing a symbols package for use with MyGet

As I will assume you are used to publishing packages to NuGet and SymbolSource, here’s what changes. First of all, you will require the URLs to which to publish. Log in to MyGet and browse to your feed details. The Feed Details tab will give you all the information you need, as you can see in the following screenshot:


In short, your feed URL remains the same. If you want to consume your private feed in Visual Studio or using the NuGet Package Manager Console, simply add as the source. The thing that changed is the publish URL: if you want to publish your packages to MyGet, use the URL as the publish URL. For symbol packages, your URL will be in the form of

The publish workflow to publish the SamplePackage.1.0.0.nupkg to a MyGet feed, including symbols, would be issuing the following two commands from the console:

1 nuget push SamplePackage.1.0.0.nupkg 00000000-0000-0000-0000-00000000000 -Source 2 3 nuget push SamplePackage.1.0.0.Symbols.nupkg 00000000-0000-0000-0000-00000000000 -Source

An example of these commands can also be found on the Feed Details tab for your MyGet feed.

Consuming symbol packages in Visual Studio

When logging in to MyGet, you can find the symbols URL compatible with Visual Studio under the Feed Details tab for your MyGet feed. This URL will be the same for all feeds you are allowed to consume, so no need to configure 10+ symbol servers in Visual Studio. Here’s how to configure it.

First of all, Visual Studio typically will only debug your own source code, the source code of the project or projects that are currently opened in Visual Studio. To disable this behavior and to instruct Visual Studio to also try to debug code other than the projects that are currently opened, open the Options dialog (under the menu Tools > Options). Find the Debugging node on the left and click the General node underneath. Turn off the option Enable Just My Code. Also turn on the option Enable source server support. This usually triggers a warning message but it is safe to just click Yes and continue with the settings specified.

MyGet symbol server in Visual Studio

Keep the Options dialog opened and find the Symbols node under the Debugging node on the left. In the dialog shown in Figure 4-14, add the symbol server URL for your MyGet feed: After that, click OK to confirm configuration changes and consume symbols for NuGet packages.


Running Memcached on Windows Azure for PHP

After three conferences in two weeks with a lot of “airport time”, which typically converts into “let’s code!” time, I think I may have tackled a commonly requested Windows Azure feature for PHP developers. Some sort of distributed caching is always a great thing to have when building scalable services and applications. While Windows Azure offers a distributed caching layer under the form of the Windows Azure Caching, that components currently lacks support for non-.NET technologies. I’ve heard there’s work being done there, but that’s not very interesting if you are building your app today. This blog post will show you how to modify a Windows Azure deployment to run and use Memcached in the easiest possible manner.

Note: this post focuses on PHP but can also be used to setup Memcached on Windows Azure for NodeJS, Java, Ruby, Python, …

Related downloads:
The scaffolder source code: (1.12 mb)
The scaffolder, packaged and ready for use: MemcachedScaffolder.phar (2.87 mb)

The short version: use my scaffolder

As you may know, when working with PHP on Windows Azure and when making use of the Windows Azure SDK, you can use and create scaffolders. The Windows Azure SDK for PHP includes a powerful scaffolding feature that allows users to quickly setup a pre-packaged and configured website ready for Windows Azure.

If you want to use Memcached in your project, do the following:

  • Download my custom MemcacheScaffolder (MemcachedScaffolder.phar (2.87 mb)) and make sure it is located either under the scaffolders folder of the Windows Azure SDK for PHP, or that you remember the path to this scaffolder
  • Run the scaffolder from the command line: (note: best use the latest SVN version of the command line tools)
1 scaffolder run -out="c:\temp\myapp" -s="MemcachedScaffolder"

  • Find the newly created Windows Azure project structure in the folder you’ve used.
  • In your PHP code, simply add require_once ''; to your code, and enjoy the $memcache variable which will hold a preconfigured Memcached client for you to use. This $memcache instance will also be automatically updated when adding more server instances or deleting server instances.
  • 1 require_once '';

    That’s it!

    The long version: what this scaffolder does behind the scenes

    Of course, behind this “developers can simply use 1 line of code” trick a lot of things happen in the background. Let’s go through the places I’ve made changes from the default scaffolder.

    The ServiceDefinition.csdef file

    Let’s start with the beginning: when running Memcached in a Windows Azure instance, you’ll have to specify it with a port number to use. As such, the ServiceDefinition.csdef file which defines what the datacenter configuration for your app should be looks like the following:

    1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> 2 <ServiceDefinition name="PhpOnAzure" xmlns=""> 3 <WebRole name="PhpOnAzure.Web" enableNativeCodeExecution="true"> 4 <Sites> 5 <Site name="Web" physicalDirectory="./PhpOnAzure.Web"> 6 <Bindings> 7 <Binding name="Endpoint1" endpointName="HttpEndpoint" /> 8 </Bindings> 9 </Site> 10 </Sites> 11 <Startup> 12 <Task commandLine="add-environment-variables.cmd" executionContext="elevated" taskType="simple" /> 13 <Task commandLine="install-php.cmd" executionContext="elevated" taskType="simple"> 14 <Environment> 15 <Variable name="EMULATED"> 16 <RoleInstanceValue xpath="/RoleEnvironment/Deployment/@emulated" /> 17 </Variable> 18 </Environment> 19 </Task> 20 <Task commandLine="memcached.cmd" executionContext="elevated" taskType="background" /> 21 <Task commandLine="monitor-environment.cmd" executionContext="elevated" taskType="background" /> 22 </Startup> 23 <Endpoints> 24 <InputEndpoint name="HttpEndpoint" protocol="http" port="80" /> 25 <InternalEndpoint name="MemcachedEndpoint" protocol="tcp" /> 26 </Endpoints> 27 <Imports> 28 <Import moduleName="Diagnostics"/> 29 </Imports> 30 <ConfigurationSettings> 31 </ConfigurationSettings> 32 </WebRole> 33 </ServiceDefinition>

    Note the <InternalEndpoint name="MemcachedEndpoint" protocol="tcp" /> line of code. This one defines that the web role instance should open some TCP port in the firewall with the name MemcachedEndpoint and expose that to the other virtual machines in your deployment. We’ll use this named endpoint later when starting Memcached.

    Something else in this file is noteworthy: the startup tasks under the <Startup> element. With the default scaffolder, the first two tasks (namely add-environment-variables.cmd and install-php.cmd) are also present. These do nothing more than providing some environment information about your deployment in the environment variables. The second one does what its name implies: install PHP on your virtual machine. The latter two scripts added, memcached.cmd and monitor-environment.cmd are used to bootstrap Memcached. Note these two tasks run as background tasks: I wanted to have these two always running to ensure when Memcached crashes the task can simply restart Memcached.

    The php folder

    If you’ve played with the default scaffolder in the Windows Azure SDK for PHP, you probably know that the PHP installation in Windows Azure is a “default” one. This means: no memcached extension is in there. To overcome this, simply copy the correct php_memcache.dll extension into the /php/ext folder and Windows Azure (well, the install-php.cmd script) will know what to do with it.

    Memcached.cmd and Memcached.ps1

    Under the application’s bin folder, I’ve added some additional startup tasks. The one responsible for starting (and maintaining a running instance of) Memcached is, of course, Memcached.cmd. This one simply delegates the call to Memcached.ps1, of which the following is the source code:

    1 [Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ServiceRuntime") 2 3 # Start memcached. To infinity and beyond! 4 while (1) { 5 $p = [diagnostics.process]::Start("memcached.exe", "-m 64 -p " + [Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ServiceRuntime.RoleEnvironment]::CurrentRoleInstance.InstanceEndpoints["MemcachedEndpoint"].IPEndpoint.Port) 6 $p.WaitForExit() 7 }

    To be honest, this file is pretty simple. It loads the WindowsAzure ServiceRuntime assembly which contains all kinds of information about the current deployment. Next, I start an infinite loop which continuously starts a new memcached.exe process consuming 64MB of RAM memory and listens on the port specified by the MemcachedEndpoint defined earlier.

    Monitor-environment.cmd and Monitor-environment.ps1

    The monitor-environment.cmd script takes the same approach as the memcached.cmd script: just pass the command along to a PowerShell script in the form of monitor-environment.ps1. I do want to show you the monitor-environment.cmd script however, as there’s one difference in there: I’m changing the file system permissions for my application (the icacls line).

    1 @echo off 2 cd "%~dp0" 3 4 icacls %RoleRoot%\approot /grant "Everyone":F /T 5 6 powershell.exe Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted 7 powershell.exe .\monitor-environment.ps1

    The reason for changing permissions is simple: I want to make sure I can write a PHP script to disk every minute. Yes, you heard me! I’m using PowerShell (in the monitor-environment.ps1 script) to generate PHP code. Here’s the PowerShell:

    1 [Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ServiceRuntime") 2 3 # To infinity and beyond! 4 5 while(1) { 6 ########################################################## 7 # Create memcached include file for PHP 8 ########################################################## 9 10 # Dump all memcached endpoints to ../memcached-servers.php 11 $memcached = "<?php`r`n" 12 $memcached += "`$memcachedServers = array(" 13 14 $currentRolename = [Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ServiceRuntime.RoleEnvironment]::CurrentRoleInstance.Role.Name 15 $roles = [Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ServiceRuntime.RoleEnvironment]::Roles 16 foreach ($role in $roles.Keys | sort-object) { 17 if ($role -eq $currentRolename) { 18 $instances = $roles[$role].Instances 19 for ($i = 0; $i -lt $instances.Count; $i++) { 20 $endpoints = $instances[$i].InstanceEndpoints 21 foreach ($endpoint in $endpoints.Keys | sort-object) { 22 if ($endpoint -eq "MemcachedEndpoint") { 23 $memcached += "array(`"" 24 $memcached += $endpoints[$endpoint].IPEndpoint.Address 25 $memcached += "`" ," 26 $memcached += $endpoints[$endpoint].IPEndpoint.Port 27 $memcached += "), " 28 } 29 30 31 } 32 } 33 } 34 } 35 36 $memcached += ");" 37 38 Write-Output $memcached | Out-File -Encoding Ascii ../memcached-servers.php 39 40 # Restart the loop in 1 minute 41 Start-Sleep -Seconds 60 42 }

    The output is being written every minute to the memcached-servers.php file. Why every minute? Well, if servers are added or removed I want my application to use the correct set of servers. This leaves a possible gap of one minute where some server may not be available, you can easily catch any error related to this in your PHP code (or add a comment to this blog post telling me what’s a better interval). Anyway, here’s the sample output:

    1 <?php 2 $memcachedServers = array(array('', 11211), array('', 11211), );

    All there’s left to do is consume this array. I’ve added a default file in the root of the web role to make things easy:

    1 <?php 2 require_once $_SERVER["RoleRoot"] . '\\approot\\memcached-servers.php'; 3 $memcache = new Memcache(); 4 foreach ($memcachedServers as $memcachedServer) { 5 if (strpos($memcachedServer[0], '127.') !== false) { 6 $memcachedServer[0] = 'localhost'; 7 } 8 $memcache->addServer($memcachedServer[0], $memcachedServer[1]); 9 }

    Include this file in your code and you have a full-blown distributed cache available in your Windows Azure deployment! Here’s a sample of some operations that can be done on Memcached:

    1 <?php 2 error_reporting(E_ALL); 3 require_once ''; 4 5 var_dump($memcachedServers); 6 var_dump($memcache->getVersion()); 7 8 $memcache->set('key1', 'value1', false, 30); 9 echo $memcache->get('key1'); 10 11 $memcache->set('var_key', 'some really big variable', MEMCACHE_COMPRESSED, 50); 12 echo $memcache->get('var_key');

    That’s it!

    Conclusion and feedback

    This is just a fun project I’ve been working on when lonely and bored on airports. However, if you think this is valuable and in your opinion should be made available as a standard thing in the Windows Azure SDK for PHP, let me know. I’ll be happy to push this into the main branch and make sure it’s available in a future release.

    Comments or praise? There’s a comment form right below this post!